Spacious condo in historic Providence industrial complex

The Monohasset Mill complex was renovated into 39 live-work condominiums by a group of artists in 2001

The dining area of the condo at the Monohasset Mill, which features an open room layout. [The Providence Journal / Kris Craig]
The dining area of the condo at the Monohasset Mill, which features an open room layout. [The Providence Journal / Kris Craig]

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The Monohasset Mill was one of the first industrial complexes in Providence to be redeveloped for residential use.

In 2001-2002, a group of artists, Erik Bright, Lori Quinn, Clayton Rockefeller, David Stem and Joel Taplin, bought the property and began the process to renovate the six-building, 63,000-square-foot complex into 39 live-work condominiums.

Today, a fourth-floor condo there is being sold by graphic artist Sandra Kenney. It is a one-bedroom unit with more than 1,200 square feet of living space, including tall windows, exposed brick and white painted walls, and an open, light kitchen-living-dining area. There is a roomy modern bathroom with white subway tile, a black and white tiled floor, a white pedestal sink and a soaking tub-shower combination.

There are built-in storage closets in the hallway leading to the private bedroom, which has two large windows and a wood-plank ceiling. Several lofted spaces throughout the unit provide more room to store things.

The condo also has a narrow alcove near the dining area that could be used as a mini office. It has a curved-top window and exposed brick walls.

A small alcove off the dining area that could be used as office space. [The Providence Journal / Kris Craig]
A small alcove off the dining area that could be used as office space. [The Providence Journal / Kris Craig]
The kitchen has stainless steel appliances, including a gas range, a raised black granite counter for casual dining, a double farmhouse sink, and light wood cabinets.

Kenney said several of the condominiums at the complex have been combined since they were first sold. She said the complex is one of the few in the city where residents are allowed to have large dogs, if they are well-behaved.

Across the street, the newly redeveloped U.S Rubber Lofts complex is part of the neighborhood’s changing landscape. The Monohasset Mill is also adjacent to The Steel Yard, a steel and iron complex that houses a variety of industrial arts facilities.

The Providence Preservation Society/American Institute of Architects Guide to Providence Architecture said the Monohasset complex, built in 1866 and designed by James C. Bucklin, was first built to house a wool-manufacturing company, but it later “served as a home to a steam-engine-manufacturing company for the last two decades of the 19th Century.” It was used for worsted-wool production in the early 20th Century, then later housed a mix of industrial tenants before it was converted to live-work space.

The redevelopment was financed by a number of sources, including the Providence Revolving Fund, and it was completed in 2006. “It took three phases over five years and plenty of sweat equity, but this courageous crew managed to develop one very creative community that still thrives today,” according to an account by Truth Box, Inc., the architectural firm that worked on the project.

“The project marked the earliest iteration of our green building approach: first do no harm. By NOT demolishing the building and reusing it for a new purpose, the developers gave Truth Box the chance to explore the difficult topic of insulating masonry walls and finding ways to insulate the buildings while still working within the Park Service guidelines for historic preservation,” Truth Box reported on its website. “We used ‘combi’ units [combined heat and hot water] to economize on energy and space constraints. Tall ceilings allowed plenty of room for duct work, while ceiling fans circulate the stratified air throughout the open floor plans.”

The condominium at 532 Kinsley Ave., Unit 404, Providence, is priced at $324,900. Real-estate taxes for 2017 are estimated at $5,000. For more information, contact John Rapoza or Christine Dupuis at Lila Delman Real Estate International, (401) 626-1945.

cdunn@providencejournal.com

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